Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 16th World Medical Nanotechnology Congress Tokyo, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Hussein O. Ammar

Chairman, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Future University, Egypt

Keynote: Recent Applications of Nanotechnology in Advanced Drug Delivery Systems

Time : 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Medical Nanotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hussein O. Ammar photo
Biography:

Dr. Hussein Ammar, Holder of the First Class Golden Medal for Sciences and Arts and the recipient of the 2010 Appreciation State Prize in the realm of Advanced Technological Sciences. Professor Ammar is currently the Chairman, Pharmaceutical Technology Department, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Industries, Future University in Egypt; formerly, Dean of the Pharmacy Division, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt. He has 123 research papers published in international scientific journals. These research papers cover most of the areas related to pharmaceutics, bio pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics. Design of new drug delivery systems is not beyond the scope of his interest.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology is attracting great attention worldwide in biomedicine. Targeted therapy based on drug nanocarrier systems enhances the treatment of tumors and enables the development of targeted drug delivery systems.In recent years, theranostics are emerging as the next generation of multifunctional nanomedicine to improve the therapeutic outcome of cancer therapy. Polymeric nanoparticles with targeting moieties containing magnetic nanoparticles as theranostic agents have considerable potential for the treatment of cancer.The use of directed enzyme prodrug therapy (DEPT) has been investigated as a means to improve the tumor selectivity of therapeutics. Magnetic DEPT involves coupling the bioactive prodrug-activating enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles that are then selectively delivered to the tumor by applying an external magnetic field. Gene therapy is an attractive method for meeting the needs for curing brain disorders, such as Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease. On the other hand, due to the fact that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is resistant to standard chemotherapeutic agents, gene therapy appears to be a more effective cure for HCC patients.Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is a novel technique for enhancing the penetration of drugs into diseased tissue beds noninvasively. This technique is broadly appealing, given the potential of ultrasound to control drug delivery spatially and temporally in a noninvasive manner.

 

 

Keynote Forum

Shaker A. Mousa

Executive Vice President and Chairman,Pharmaceutical Research Institute, USA

Keynote: Impact of Nanomedicine on the Future of Medicine: The Road Toward Precision Medicine/Case Studies

Time : 9:30 AM - 10 :00 AM

Medical Nanotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shaker A. Mousa photo
Biography:

Dr. Mousa finished PhD from Ohio State University, College of Medicine, Columbus, OH and Post-doctoral Fellowship, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY. He also received his MBA from Widener University, Chester, PA. Dr. Mousa is currently an endowed tenure Professor and Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and Vice Provost for Research at ACPHS. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Mousa was a senior Scientist and fellow at The DuPont Pharmaceutical Company for 17 years where he contributed to the discovery and development of several FDA approved and globally marketed diagnostics and Therapeutics.He holds over 350 US and International Patents discovering novel anti-angiogenesis strategies, antithrombotics, anti-integrins, anti-cancer, and non-invasive diagnostic imaging approaches employing various Nanotechnology platforms. His has published more than 1,000 journal articles, book chapters, published patents, and books as editor and author. He is a member of several NIH study sections, and the editorial board of several high impact Journals. His research has focused on diagnostics and therapeutics of angiogenesis-related disorders, thrombosis, vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

Abstract:

Over the past few years, evidence from the scientific and medical communities has demonstrated that nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine have tremendous potential to profoundly impact numerous aspects of cancer and other disorders in term of early diagnosis and targeted therapy. The utilization of nanotechnology for the development of new nano-carrier systems has the potential to offer improved chemotherapeutic delivery through increased solubility and sustained retention. One of the major advantages of this cutting edge technology is its unique multifunctional characteristics. Targeted delivery of drug incorporated nanoparticles, through conjugation of tumor-specific cell surface markers, such as tumor-specific antibodies or ligands, which can enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug and reduce the side effects. Additionally, multifunctional characteristics of the nano-carrier system would allow for simultaneous imaging of tumor mass, targeted drug delivery and monitoring (Theranostics). A summary of recent progress in nanotechnology as it relates specifically to nanoparticles and anticancer drug delivery will be reviewed. Nano Nutraceuticals using combination of various natural products provide a great potential in diseases prevention. Additionally, various Nanomedicine approaches for the detection and treatment of various types of organ specific delivery, vascular targeting, and vaccine will be briefly discussed.

Keynote Forum

Thomas Prevenslik

QED Radiations, Hong Kong

Keynote: Nanoparticles and DNA damage

Time : 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Medical Nanotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Thomas Prevenslik photo
Biography:

Thomas Prevenslik developed the simple theory of QED based on the Planck law of QM. Differing from the complex QED by Feynman and others, simple QED assumes any heat absorbed in nanoparticles having high surface-to-volume ratios place interior atoms under high EM confinement that by the Planck law of QM precludes the atoms from having the heat capacity to conserve heat by an increase in temperature. In the instant topic of Nanoparticles and DNA damage, the NPs are not physical entities, but rather are nano globules that form from adjuvants upon mixing with water prior to spraying, the adjuvants added to Monsanto’s herbicide glyphosate to enhance penetration through the leaves of weeds. Since crops are contiguous with weeds, the NPs of nano bubbles finally reside in the crop and upon ingestion in the human. Heat produced in metabolism produces low levels of UV radiation that damages the DNA of nearby cells. Monsanto is urged to stop the use of the glyphosate and adjuvants to avoid DNA damage leading to cancer in the present and successive human generations.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Nanoparticles or NPs are known to cause DNA damage [1] for over at least the past decades, but the causal relation of NPs to human health remains unknown. Chemical reactions of NPs with the DNA cannot be the causal relation as DNA damage occurs [2] even with inert gold NPs suggesting a physical causal relation such as high temperature. Photodynamic therapy [3] is thought to kill cancer cells by high temperatures in laser heating of NPs. Although the laser increases the temperature of surrounding tissue, the NP temperature itself does not because the Planck law of QM requires [4] the NP heat capacity to vanish. QM stands for quantum mechanics. Methodology: Contrarily, photodynamic therapy does not induce necrosis of cancers by increasing the temperature of the quantum sized NPs, and instead NPs produce EM radiation beyond the UV that induces cancer necrosis suggesting the causal relation of NPs to human health is therefore the well-known genotoxicity of DNA to UV radiation. The wavelength  of the emitted EM radiation is,  = 2nd, where n and d are the refractive index and diameter of the NP. For NPs having n = 1.5, DNA damage for EM radiation beyond the UVC (  < 254 nm ) occurs [5] for NP diameters d < 85 nm as shown in Figure 1. Discussion: Solar UV is only thought to cause DNA damage to the skin and may lead to cancer, but cannot penetrate the skin to damage internal organs. However, NPs rescind this paradigm. Indeed, NPs by entering the body in the GM food we eat produce [1] the low levels UV to damage the DNA of tissue in the gut and digestive tract. The DNA damage from GM food that includes NPs in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide tot enhances crop yields by controlling weeds in modern agriculture are discussed. GM stands for genetically modified. Recommendations To avoid genetic cancers in human DNA evolution, herbicide manufacturers should stop use of NPs in controlling weeds.

  • Nanomedicine |DNA Nanotechnology |Nanoelectronics and Biomedical Devices |Nano Pharmaceuticals | Cancer Nanotechnology |Polymer Nanotechnology | Nanotoxicity Bio-Nanomaterials and Tissues Engineering | Environment, Health and Safety Issues |Recent developments in Nanotechnology and Nanoscience

Session Introduction

Abdeen Omer

Occupational Health Administration, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare,Khartoum, Sudan

Title: Medicine distribution, regulatory privatisation, social welfare services and its alternatives

Time : 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Speaker
Biography:

Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Occupational Health Administration, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Khartoum, Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

Abstract:

The strategy of price liberalisation and privatisation had been implemented in Sudan over the last decade, and has had a positive result on government deficit. The investment law approved recently has good statements and rules on the above strategy in particular to pharmacy regulations. Under the pressure of the new privatisation policy, the government introduced radical changes in the pharmacy regulations. To improve the effectiveness of the public pharmacy, resources should be switched towards areas of need, reducing inequalities and promoting better health conditions. Medicines are financed either through cost sharing or full private. The role of the private services is significant. A review of reform of financing medicines in Sudan is given in this article. Also, it highlights the current drug supply system in the public sector, which is currently responsibility of the Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation (CMS). In Sudan, the researchers did not identify any rigorous evaluations or quantitative studies about the impact of drug regulations on the quality of medicines and how to protect public health against counterfeit or low quality medicines, although it is practically possible. However, the regulations must be continually evaluated to ensure the public health is protected against by marketing high quality medicines rather than commercial interests, and the drug companies are held accountable for their conducts.

Ahmed Mokhtar Ramzy

faculty of agriculture at Cario University, Egypt

Title: E-BABE- Use of Nano-plates for Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria in Water Tubes

Time : 11:00 AM-11:30 AM

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed Mokhtar has completed his B.Sc in Biotechnology at the age of 22 years from faculty of agriculture at Cario University as fouth on the honor list of the program and master student at bioinformatics institute suez canal university .He is a Resaerch intern at biomedical lab from Helioplois University. He is the director of BioCourses, a premier Eduactional service organization.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology is an emerging field that covers a wide range of disciplines, including the frontiers of chemistry, materials, medicine, electronics, optics, sensors, information storage,communication, energy conversion, environmental protection, aerospace and more. It focuses on the design, synthesis, characterization and application of materials and devices at the nanoscale Nanomaterials are the foundation of nanotechnology and are anticipated to open new avenues to numerous emerging technological applications. Nanotechnology has grown very fast in the past two decades because of the availability of new approaches and tools for the synthesis, characterization, and manipulation of nanomaterials he purification of drinking water is a primary environmental application of nanotechnology. Contamination and over freshwater resources. Seawater is becoming a recognized source for drinking water, as freshwater becomes significantly scarce. We use the iron oxide nanoplates carried with specific virus that detect the Pathogeneic bacteria (E.COLI) in water tube as a indicator for the pathogenicity of the water tube and as method for chossing the suitable way for water purification.

Rishabh Rastogi

Institute of Science and Technology, Belvaux, Luxembourg

Title: Confined Nanoscale geometries to enhance sensitivity of Plasmonic Immunoassays
Speaker
Biography:

Rishabh Rastogi is a PhD. Student from Delhi, India. During his studies he worked within different laboratories learning scientific skills and gaining experience in nanofabrication, which made him motivated towards this field. He is working on fabrication of structures that engineered nanoscopically in order to achieve enhancement in electromagnetic waves due to confinement effects. At LIST he is working towards developing plasmonic immunoassays with extreme sensitivity.

Abstract:

Sensitive transduction of bio-molecular binding events on chip carries profound implications to the outcome of a range of biological sensors. This includes biosensors that address both research as well as diagnostic questions of clinical relevance, e.g. profiling of biomarkers, protein expression analysis, drug or toxicity screening and drug-efficacy monitoring. Nanostructured biosensors constitute a promising advance in this direction owing to their ability in catering to better sensitivity, response times, and miniaturization. Plasmonic sensors are particularly interesting among nano-biosensors as they exploit light matter interactions in the nanoscale to transduce bio-recognition events with high sensitivity and miniaturized measurement footprints. Examples of plasmonic sensors include localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (LSPR), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The performance of the plasmonic sensors critically relies on ability to engineer nanoscale geometric attributes at length scales that typically overlap with the size of small proteins. Such geometries invariably introduce constraints on the molecular binding response, thus altering the interaction outcomes, viz. density and kinetics of adsorption, molecular orientations, in a manner that would impact the resulting optical response. A careful engineering of the nanoscale geometries can simultaneously take advantage of EM field enhancements together with molecular interaction within nanoscale geometries. To this end, this project aims at an engineered nanoscale interface with geometry tailored to simultaneously favour molecular adsorption and plasmonic enhancements for application to plasmonic sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman and Fluorescence spectroscopies.

Speaker
Biography:

Hoonsung Cho has completed his PhD from University of Cincinnati and postdoctoral studies from Harvard University School of Medicine. Hoonsung Cho is an associate professor of Chonnam National University. The main interest is multifunctional nanocarrier systems for imaging, targeting, and therapy. The current research interests include imaging cell death with multimodal vital fluorochromes and detecting extracellular DNA and RNA using fluorochrome-functionalized nanoparticles as probes for detection and manipulation of these nucleic acids. He is also doing research on the surface treatment of biomaterials using plasma for the improvement of biocompatibility and regeneration.

Abstract:

The Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative therapy that could be used adjunct to chemotherapy and surgery for curing cancer causing tissue destruction by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer (PS) and oxygen. Protamine is a high arginine peptide with membrane translocating and nuclear localizing properties. The reaction of an NHS-ester of Methylene Blue (MB) and clinical protamine (Pro), to yield MB-Pro, was described in this context and demonstration of phototoxicity which clinical protamine improved PDT effect was performed. The reaction between clinical protamine (Pro) an NHS ester of MB is a solution phase reaction with the complete modification of the protamine peptides which feature a single reactive amine at the N-terminal proline and single carboxyl group at the C-terminal arginine. The aim of this study was to find a new type of photosensitizer (PS) for PDT on in vitro and in vivo experiments and to assess the anti-tumor effect of PDT using the protamine conjugated-PS on the cancer cell line. Photodynamic cell death studies show that the MB-Pro produced has more efficient photodynamic activities than MB alone, causing rapid light induced cell death. The attachment of MB to clinical Pro, yielding MB-Pro, confers the membrane internalizing activity of its high arginine content on Methylene Blue, and can induce a rapid photodynamic cell death, presumably due to cell membrane rupture induced by light. The PDT using MB-Pro for HT-29 cells was very effective and those findings suggest that MB-Pro is one of candidate for photosensitizer in solid tumors.

Speaker
Biography:

Marjan Motiei has a bachelor in cellular and molecular biology/microbiology at Isfahan University, master of Biochemistry at Payamnoor Tehran University and PhD of Biochemistry at Razi University. Her PhD work had been focused on the fabrication and characterization of amphiphilic chitosan nanocarriers (ACNs) as hydrophobic drug carriers and she is starting a post doc position at Roya Institute and working on co-delivery of small and macro molecule drugs.

Abstract:

Various hydrophobic drugs have problems of reduced stability, water insolubility, low selectivity, and high toxicity. Any good drug carriers will need to play a significant role in resolving these problems. Chitosan due to its ability to be modified and self-assembled into nanoparticles can be used as a drug carrier with wide development potential and has the advantage of slow/controlled drug release, which improves drug solubility and stability, enhances efficacy, and reduces toxicity. However, in certain cases the loss of carrier stability against biological environments induces low bioavailability of encapsulated drugs after oral administration. The objective of this work was to develop and evaluate the performance a novel self-assembled Chitosan nanocarrier for oral delivery. The nanocarrier was prepared through cross-linking approach under acidic condition to enhance oral absorption of a hydrophobic model drug such as Letrozole (LTZ). Amphiphilic chitosan nanocarriers (ACNs) were prepared by oil-in-water emulsion/ionic gelation technique; self-assembled via electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged palmitic acid (PL) and the positively charged chitosan and stabilized by cross linking with sodium tripolyphosphate solution (TPP) under ultrasonication. Firstly, various factors including crosslinking pH, crosslinker concentration, and ratio of core/shell materials were optimized to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency (EE), loading capacity (LC) and release of LTZ. The results showed that EE, LC and release behavior of LTZ were affected significantly by various factors which lead to the optimization of the chitosan nanocarrier. Finally, the drug release behavior of the optimized nanocarriers was evaluated at different pH values of the release medium (3, 6.8 and 7.4) and confirmed that the amount of drug release in the acidic medium was slightly lower than those in the other media. In this presentation, we will discuss the key factors governing the drug delivery performance of the ACNs, the optimized nanocarrier performance and the key factors impacting the drug release behavior under various conditions.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Mirjalili, Vice President of Research and Technology, Islamic Azad University, Yazd Branch, Associate Professor of Textile Engineering & Polymer Department, received his M.Sc. (1998) in textile chemistry. Continued his post graduate studies at the Islamic Azad University, Tehran south branch related to dyeing modification of wool fabric with reactive dyes. Received his Ph. D.(2002) in textile chemistry at   Islamic Azad University of Tehran south. He conducted more than 13 Project and 9 doctoral research as well as project related to textile chemistry. He has published more than 30 scientific papers and presented at a number of national and international conferences including 12th International Toki Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion 2001 in Japan, Word Textile Conference AUTEX2009 in Turkey, Nano Technology Science 2010 in Canada, 11th World Textile Conference AUTEX 2011 in France and 12th World Textile Conference AUTEX 2012 in Croatia. His scientific work is related to Synthesis of Dyes for textile, Industrial wastewater treatment plant, Nano Technology,  Natural Dyes, Drug release, Texture engineering and Medical Engineering.

Abstract:

In recent years, healthcare professionals are confronted with patients who suffer and suffer from healing and covering of wounds and burns. During healing, wound dressing protects from wounds and injuries and contributes to the repair and recovery of skin and skin tissues. Due to biocompatibility, biodegradability and their similarity to macromolecules known to man, some natural polymers, including polysaccharides, proteins and peptides, as well as some synthetic polymers such as polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid, polyacrylic acid, polyvinyl Alcohol and. . . It is widely used in the treatment of wounds and burns. In this study, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) / polyamidoamine (PAMAM) / tetracycline (Tet) nanofibers was prepared as an electrospinning wound dressing. First, the antibacterial effect of PAMAM on two E. coli and S.Aureus bacteria was investigated and according to the results of PVA / CMC / 15% PAMAM samples were selected as optimal. Then, the release strength of different levels of tetracycline antibiotics (1, 3, 5 and 7% by weight) was investigated to prevent nanofiber-dressed wound infection. The morphology of composite nanofibers was studied with field emission electron microscopy (FESEM). The chemical structure of the nanofibers was studied by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the results of its release profile from all nanofibres were  showed that its highest release occurred within the first 12 hours. Fiber membranes containing 1, 3 and 5% by weight of tetracycline have shown drug release for more than 28 days, and for nanofibers containing 7% tetracycline over 14 days. Regarding the results of the release nanofiber wound dressings of the PVA / CMC / 15% PAMAM/ 5% Tet and the surface morphology of this nanofibre, it can be stated that the amount of by weight of Tet is optimal. FTIR spectroscopy results show the successful placement of tetracycline, polyamidoamine in nanofibres.

Hao-Han Pang

Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan

Title: Epirubicin-loading Fluorescent Qβ Virus-Like Particles Incorporated with CED for Brain Tumor Therapy
Speaker
Biography:

Hao-Han Pang has his master degree in Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan, 2017. He is now a Ph.D student in National Sun Yat-sen University. His research interests are virus-like particles applications, RNA interference scaffold design and delivery platform development. The goal of his researches is to develop different applications of virus-like particles such as designed RNA packaging and drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

Abstract:

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is known as the most lethal cancer among all astroglial tumors. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) causes low efficiency in chemotherapy due to difficulty for drugs to cross BBB. Here, we describe an anti-cancer drug, epirubicin (Epi), loaded virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) carrier system delivering drug and image tracking green fluorescent protein (GFP) simultaneously by convection-enhanced delivery (CED). VLPs are bio-nanomaterials which could be produced via in vivo protein expression and self-assembly in E. coli or other expression system. The VLPs have been described as new generation deliver platform for nucleic acid scaffold, protein, and drug delivery. In this study, we package Epi in self-assembly GFP containing Qβ VLPs ([email protected]). The [email protected] were then modified with TAT peptide on the surface to form [email protected] which can enhance the cellular uptake efficiency, resulting in low IC50 (0.05-0.075 μg/mL) for GBM U87 cells as well as free Epi. To prove the anti-tumor ability in animal, the tumor-bearing mice were treated with gVLPs, free Epi, or [email protected] by CED. We found that gVLPs are nontoxic to brain tissue. Conversely, the brain tissues will be corroded soon cause animal death when free Epi was directly injected in brain tumor. Interestingly, the brain tissues did not only damaged, but the tumor growth was inhibited as well when the tumor-bearing mice were treated with [email protected] by CED. The medium survival rate was prolonged to 42 days (single dose of [email protected]) comparted to control group (27 days), and it was further prolonged to over 50 days after the mice received two doses of [email protected] The results represented that [email protected] could be an advantageous delivering tool for slow toxic drugs release in company with CED to significantly enhance the tumor inhibition and toxicity reduction.

Speaker
Biography:

Juan Huang has her expertise in research of micro and nano carriers in the field of health. She has a rich experience in the research and application of lipid based delivery systems. Functional lipid nanoparticles have successfully improved the stability, water dispersibility and bioavailability of lipophilic ingredients. Her field of research also contains other lipid based delivery system, for example, nano-emulsions, multilayer emulsions, self-emulsifying carriers and microgels. These researches are expected to address the use of functional ingredients in pharmaceuticals, food and skin care products.

Abstract:

The aim of current research was to develop a solid self-emulsifying delivery system (SEDS) to enhance the delivery of linseed oil and quercetin. The pseudo ternary phase diagram was constructed to optimize the suitable liquid formulation. Liquid absorption on solid absorbent carrier was used to convert liquid into solid self-emulsifying lipid formulation by simple physical mixture. The solid carrier of Aerosil 300 showed highest adsorption capacity. Besides, the solid SEDS prepared with liquid formulation / Aerosil 300 ratio of 2:1 had good flow properties. FTIR indicated that linseed oil and quercetin were encapsulated in Aerosil 300. XRD study suggested that the crystalline structure of quercetin transformed to molecularly dissolved state in solid SEDS. In vitro digestion and release experiments showed that after solid adsorption, linseed oil and quercetin exhibited delayed release patterns. The accelerated oxidation study revealed that non aqueous system was more beneficial to the storage of linseed oil, and Aerosil 300 had no effect on the oxidation stability of linseed oil. Hence, solid SEDS is an attractive candidate for the encapsulation of functional oil and flavonoids for use in food industry.

Speaker
Biography:

Minoru Taya is currently Director, Center for Intelligent Materials and Systems, and also Nabtesco Endowed Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering in University of Washington. Dr. Minoru Taya obtained his BS in Engineering in 1968 from University of Tokyo, and his MS in 1973 and PhD 1977 in Theoretical Applied Mechanics from Northwestern University. Dr. Taya involved in supervising a number of projects related to multifunctional materials and composites with emphasis on sensing and active materials, and compact actuators Most recently, we is working on (i) FePd nanohelix based nanorobotics under NSF-NRI program where the FePd nanohelix can shrink and expand upon switching on and off magnetic field and (ii) soft-matter based robotic hand technology using dielectric elastomer. Dr. Taya has published over 330 papers, 5 book chapters in the area of intelligent materials and systems and composites and 7 books. In addition, he published the three monograph books

Abstract:

Recently, we successfully processed the FePd nanorobots (NRs) by using electrochemistry route and post annealing process. The actuation mechanism of the proposed FePd NRs is based on two scientific mechanisms associated with ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Fe70Pd30; (i) hybrid mechanism of chain reaction events; applied magnetic field gradient, magnetic force, stress-induced martensite phase transformation of Fe70Pd30 from stiff austenite to soft martensite, resulting in larger displacement at very high speed that we discovered and (ii) magnetic interactions coupled with stress-induced martensite phase transformation under constant magnetic field, resulting in large displacement. This phase transformation of FePd nanohelix is considered different from that of its bulk sized FePd.  It is found that the martensite start temperature(Ms) of the FePd nano-material is shifted toward lower temperature as compared with that Ms of the bulk sized FeP and also the FePd nanohelix NR can exhibits nano-motions under applied constant magnetic field. There are many applications we can apply the above FePd NRs, one of which is a new treatment of cancers by applying mechanical stress loading on live cancers, inducing mechanical stress induced cell death (MSICD) on target cancer cells. We performed a biocompatibility testing on Fe7Pd3 nanoparticles to find that the use of modest amount of the FePd nanoactuators would NOT be cytotoxic to BT-474 breast cancer cells. Here we report some preliminary results of in vitro experiment of MSICD using macroscopic mechanical loading set up which apply mainly dynamic compression loading to live target cells via agarose gel layer. The preliminary results of MSIC indicate that the live breast cancer cells under dominant compressive stress loading area exhibit a mixture of apoptosis and necrosis cell death modes while those under dominant shear stress loading area shows strongly necrosis cell mode